What Is a Smurf Attack? Definition, Types, Detection, Prevention, and Consequences

By Haseeb Awan

Smurf Attacks are a common type of cyber attack that can wreak havoc on computer networks and systems. Despite being around for over two decades, Smurf Attacks are still a significant threat to businesses and organizations of all sizes. We will explore the details of Smurf Attacks, including how they work, the different types of Smurf Attacks that hackers use to target their victims, and the historical background of these attacks. We aim to give you a deeper understanding of Smurf Attacks and how you can deal with them.

Smurf Attack Definition

A Smurf Attack is a cyber attack that can cause significant damage to computer networks and internet-connected devices. It involves flooding a victim system with many Internet Control Message Protocol (ICMP) echo requests, commonly known as "pings," which can overwhelm the target system and cause it to crash or become unresponsive.

The attack gets its name from the classic cartoon characters, the Smurfs, who are known for their ability to create large groups that can overpower their enemies. In a Smurf Attack, the attacker also creates a large group of intermediary systems, which amplify the attack and make it more powerful.

Smurf Attacks are a type of Distributed Denial of Service (DDoS) attack designed to prevent legitimate users from accessing the targeted system or network. Attackers typically launch these attacks maliciously, such as hackers or cybercriminals, who may be motivated by financial gain, political objectives, or other reasons.

To carry out a Smurf Attack, the attacker first identifies a target victim system or network. The attacker then sends many ICMP echo requests to intermediary systems, using the victim's IP address as the source. These intermediary systems, typically poorly configured or unprotected devices, then reply to the victim system with a flood of echo replies, overwhelming the victim and causing it to become unresponsive.

Understanding what a Smurf Attack is and how it works is essential to protecting computer networks and internet-connected devices from cyber threats. Organizations can help ensure the security and stability of their systems and networks by taking the necessary steps to prevent these attacks.

Also Read, What is the Process for Mitigating a DDoS Attack?

How Does a Smurf Attack Work?

A Smurf Attack floods a target system or network with many Internet Control Message Protocol (ICMP) echo requests, or "pings," which can overwhelm the system and cause it to crash or become unresponsive. The attack is named after the classic cartoon characters, the Smurfs, who are known for their ability to create large groups that can overpower their enemies. In a Smurf Attack, the attacker also creates a large group of intermediary systems, which amplify the attack and make it more powerful.

To carry out a Smurf Attack, the attacker first identifies a target victim system or network. The attacker then sends many ICMP echo requests to intermediary systems, using the victim's IP address as the source. These intermediary systems, typically poorly configured or unprotected devices, then reply to the victim system with a flood of echo replies, overwhelming the victim and causing it to become unresponsive.

Three critical components are involved in a Smurf Attack: the attacker, the intermediary systems, and the victim. The attacker uses a computer or botnet to send the ICMP echo requests to the intermediary systems. The intermediary systems, which can be compromised servers, routers, or other network devices, receive the echo requests and reply to the victim system with many echo replies. This flood of traffic can quickly overwhelm the victim system and cause it to become unresponsive.

One of the critical factors that make Smurf Attacks so effective is the ability of the attacker to use the victim's IP address as the source address in the ICMP echo requests. This makes it difficult for the victim system to differentiate between legitimate traffic and the flood of echo replies generated by the intermediary systems.

How Did Smurf Attacks Originate?

Smurf Attacks have been around for decades and have evolved as technology, and internet connectivity have changed. The origins of Smurf Attacks can be traced back to the late 1990s when the Internet Control Message Protocol (ICMP) was first introduced as part of the TCP/IP protocol suite. ICMP was designed to provide feedback about the status of a network and help troubleshoot network connectivity issues.

Unfortunately, attackers quickly discovered that ICMP could also be used as a weapon. In 1997, a hacker named Jolt2 discovered that by sending a flood of ICMP echo requests to a victim system, he could cause it to become unresponsive. This was the first known instance of what would later be called a Smurf Attack.

In the years that followed, Smurf Attacks became increasingly common, and attackers began to use them to target large networks and internet service providers (ISPs). One of the most notable examples of a Smurf Attack occurred in 2000, when a group of hackers targeted the University of Minnesota with a massive Smurf Attack, causing significant disruption to the university's network.

Despite being a relatively old attack technique, Smurf Attacks are still relevant today. They remain popular for attackers because they are relatively simple and can cause significant damage. Additionally, with the increasing number of internet-connected devices, there are more potential targets for attackers to exploit.

Want Guaranteed Protection Against SIM Swap? Reach Out to Us.

Types of Smurf Attack

Smurf Attacks are a severe threat to network security. Attackers use various techniques to overwhelm victim systems with traffic, making them unresponsive and causing significant disruption. These attacks can range in difficulty and how much harm they can cause their victims. Here are the most common types you should know about:

Basic Smurf Attack 

This type of attack is the most straightforward and easiest to execute. In a Basic Smurf Attack, the attacker sends a flood of ICMP echo requests to a victim system, using the victim's IP address as the source address. The idea is to flood the victim system with so much traffic that it becomes overwhelmed and unresponsive. This is possible because of the way that ICMP works. When a system receives an ICMP echo request, it responds with an ICMP echo reply. The attacker takes advantage of this by sending a flood of requests to the victim system, sending a flood of replies back to the victim, effectively drowning it in traffic.

Distributed Smurf Attack 

This type of attack is similar to the Basic Smurf Attack but is carried out using a botnet, a network of compromised devices that the attacker controls. In a Distributed Smurf Attack, the attacker sends a flood of ICMP echo requests to the victim system from many different sources, making it even more challenging to defend against. Using a botnet, the attacker can increase the traffic sent to the victim system, making the attack more powerful and harder to detect.

Amplified Smurf Attack 

In an Amplified Smurf Attack, the attacker uses intermediary systems configured to amplify the attack traffic. This makes the attack even more powerful and challenging to defend against. The attacker sends the ICMP echo requests to the intermediary systems, amplifying the traffic and sending it to the victim system. This attack is often used in conjunction with a botnet, making it even more challenging to stop. Intermediary systems that can be used for amplification include open DNS resolvers and Network Time Protocol (NTP) servers.

Ping of Death Smurf Attack  

This attack takes advantage of a vulnerability in the victim system's network stack. The attacker sends oversized ICMP packets to the victim system, causing it to crash or become unresponsive. The vulnerability is caused by a flaw in how some systems handle oversized packets. When a system receives a large packet, it tries to allocate memory to hold the packet. The system may crash or become unresponsive if the packet is too big. This type of attack is less common than it once was, but it is still a threat to older systems that must be adequately updated or patched.

Fraggle Attack 

A Fraggle Attack is similar to a Smurf Attack, but instead of using ICMP traffic, the attacker uses User Datagram Protocol (UDP) traffic. The attacker sends a flood of UDP packets to the victim system, using the victim's IP address as the source. Like a Smurf Attack, a Fraggle Attack can quickly overwhelm the victim's system and cause it to become unresponsive. Fraggle Attacks are not as common as Smurf Attacks, but they still threaten organizations and individuals.

Consequences of Smurf Attacks

Smurf Attacks can have severe consequences for both individuals and organizations. The consequences of a Smurf Attack can be severe, including data loss, service disruption, and financial losses. In some cases, the attack can even permanently damage the targeted system or network. Here are some of the most significant impacts of these attacks:

Network Disruption 

Smurf Attacks can cause significant network disruption, making it difficult or impossible for users to access essential resources or services. The attack floods the victim system with a high traffic volume, overwhelming its resources and making it unresponsive or crashing together. This can result in lost productivity and revenue and damage the organization's reputation if customers or clients need access to their services.

Financial Losses 

Financial losses are another significant consequence of Smurf Attacks. For businesses that rely on their websites or networks to conduct their operations, a Smurf Attack can prevent them from processing orders or sales. The financial impact can be severe if this occurs during a peak sales period, such as a holiday season or a product launch. Smurf Attacks can also result in increased expenses, such as those incurred from repairing and replacing damaged systems or implementing additional security measures.

Data Loss 

Smurf Attacks can also result in data loss or corruption. If a system crashes due to the attack, data stored on that system may become inaccessible or even permanently lost. This can be particularly damaging if the data is critical to the organization's operations or contains sensitive information such as customer data, financial records, or intellectual property.

Reputation Damage 

When a company's systems are down, or its services are inaccessible due to a Smurf Attack, it can damage its reputation with customers and partners. The organization may appear unprofessional, unreliable, or insecure, negatively impacting customer trust and loyalty. This can damage the organization's reputation long-term and even result in losing customers or clients.

Legal Consequences 

In addition to the financial and reputational damage, Smurf Attacks can also have legal consequences. Depending on the nature of the attack and the laws in the affected jurisdiction, victims may be able to pursue legal action against the attackers to recover damages. Organizations that experience a Smurf Attack may also face penalties for violating regulations or contractual obligations if they cannot fulfill their duties due to the attack.

Smurf Attack Prevention Tactics

Like most other cyber security threats, you can also prevent Smurf attacks. Understanding the prevention tactics is essential to ensure your business is secure. Here are some things you can do to prevent a Smurf Attack on your business:

Implement Access Controls

Access controls are security measures to restrict unauthorized access to a system or network. In the case of Smurf Attacks, access controls can limit who can send ICMP packets to your network. By configuring firewalls only to allow ICMP traffic from trusted sources, such as your network or specific IP addresses, you can prevent attackers from exploiting your network using this method.

Network Segmentation 

Network segmentation is dividing a network into smaller, more manageable segments. This approach can help limit the potential damage of a Smurf Attack by isolating the affected systems and containing the attack's impact. By segmenting your network, you can also make identifying and isolating the affected systems easier.

Regular Security Audits 

Regular security audits can help organizations identify vulnerabilities in their systems and networks before attackers exploit them. This can include vulnerability assessments, penetration testing, and other security testing techniques. By regularly reviewing and updating your security controls, policies, and procedures, you can ensure you are up-to-date with the latest security threats and vulnerabilities.

Implement Traffic Filtering 

Traffic filtering inspects network traffic and blocks or allows traffic based on predefined rules. Intrusion prevention systems (IPS) and intrusion detection systems (IDS) are examples of traffic filtering tools that can help prevent Smurf Attacks. These tools can identify and filter out malicious traffic before it reaches your network, reducing the risk of a successful Smurf Attack.

Stay Up-to-Date with Security Best Practices 

Keeping up-to-date with security best practices is essential for preventing Smurf Attacks. This includes staying informed about the latest security threats and vulnerabilities, regularly reviewing and updating your security policies and procedures, and ensuring all employees know their roles and responsibilities in maintaining a secure network.

Use Anti-Malware and Anti-Virus Software 

Anti-malware and anti-virus software can help detect and remove malware or viruses that may be used to launch a Smurf Attack. These tools can also help prevent attackers from gaining access to your network and systems in the first place by identifying and blocking known threats.

How to Deal With a Smurf Attack in Progress?

Firstly, it's essential to identify that a Smurf Attack is occurring. This can be done by monitoring network traffic for abnormally high levels of ICMP traffic or by using intrusion detection systems to detect and alert the attack.

Once you've identified the attack, the next step is to isolate the infected systems. This involves disconnecting affected systems from the network to prevent the attack from spreading and causing further damage. It's also essential to identify the source of the attack and block it from sending any additional ICMP traffic to your network.

After isolating the infected systems and blocking the attack source, the next step is to assess the extent of the damage caused by the attack. This may involve checking for any data loss or corruption or identifying other security vulnerabilities the attacker may have exploited.

Finally, it's essential to implement measures to prevent future attacks. This may include implementing access controls, network segmentation, regular security audits, traffic filtering, staying up-to-date with security best practices, and using anti-malware and anti-virus software. It's also essential to educate employees on the risks of cyber attacks and the importance of adhering to security policies and procedures.

To Sum it Up

Smurf Attacks are a severe threat to businesses and organizations of all sizes. Hackers can use various types of Smurf Attacks to target their victims, causing severe damage to computer networks and systems. Fortunately, there are many steps you can take to prevent a Smurf Attack from happening in the first place, such as implementing proper network security measures, staying up-to-date on the latest security patches, and educating your employees on safe browsing habits. In a Smurf Attack, quick and decisive action can make all the difference in minimizing the damage done. By understanding the basics of Smurf Attacks and taking the necessary steps to prevent and respond to them, you can better protect your network and keep your sensitive data safe. Remember, being proactive in your approach to cybersecurity is vital to staying one step ahead of attackers and keeping your business safe from harm.

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Cyber Security
What Is a Smurf Attack?
Haseeb Awan
March 26, 2023
20 min
12

Smurf Attacks are a common type of cyber attack that can wreak havoc on computer networks and systems. Despite being around for over two decades, Smurf Attacks are still a significant threat to businesses and organizations of all sizes. We will explore the details of Smurf Attacks, including how they work, the different types of Smurf Attacks that hackers use to target their victims, and the historical background of these attacks. We aim to give you a deeper understanding of Smurf Attacks and how you can deal with them.

Smurf Attack Definition

A Smurf Attack is a cyber attack that can cause significant damage to computer networks and internet-connected devices. It involves flooding a victim system with many Internet Control Message Protocol (ICMP) echo requests, commonly known as "pings," which can overwhelm the target system and cause it to crash or become unresponsive.

The attack gets its name from the classic cartoon characters, the Smurfs, who are known for their ability to create large groups that can overpower their enemies. In a Smurf Attack, the attacker also creates a large group of intermediary systems, which amplify the attack and make it more powerful.

Smurf Attacks are a type of Distributed Denial of Service (DDoS) attack designed to prevent legitimate users from accessing the targeted system or network. Attackers typically launch these attacks maliciously, such as hackers or cybercriminals, who may be motivated by financial gain, political objectives, or other reasons.

To carry out a Smurf Attack, the attacker first identifies a target victim system or network. The attacker then sends many ICMP echo requests to intermediary systems, using the victim's IP address as the source. These intermediary systems, typically poorly configured or unprotected devices, then reply to the victim system with a flood of echo replies, overwhelming the victim and causing it to become unresponsive.

Understanding what a Smurf Attack is and how it works is essential to protecting computer networks and internet-connected devices from cyber threats. Organizations can help ensure the security and stability of their systems and networks by taking the necessary steps to prevent these attacks.

Also Read, What is the Process for Mitigating a DDoS Attack?

How Does a Smurf Attack Work?

A Smurf Attack floods a target system or network with many Internet Control Message Protocol (ICMP) echo requests, or "pings," which can overwhelm the system and cause it to crash or become unresponsive. The attack is named after the classic cartoon characters, the Smurfs, who are known for their ability to create large groups that can overpower their enemies. In a Smurf Attack, the attacker also creates a large group of intermediary systems, which amplify the attack and make it more powerful.

To carry out a Smurf Attack, the attacker first identifies a target victim system or network. The attacker then sends many ICMP echo requests to intermediary systems, using the victim's IP address as the source. These intermediary systems, typically poorly configured or unprotected devices, then reply to the victim system with a flood of echo replies, overwhelming the victim and causing it to become unresponsive.

Three critical components are involved in a Smurf Attack: the attacker, the intermediary systems, and the victim. The attacker uses a computer or botnet to send the ICMP echo requests to the intermediary systems. The intermediary systems, which can be compromised servers, routers, or other network devices, receive the echo requests and reply to the victim system with many echo replies. This flood of traffic can quickly overwhelm the victim system and cause it to become unresponsive.

One of the critical factors that make Smurf Attacks so effective is the ability of the attacker to use the victim's IP address as the source address in the ICMP echo requests. This makes it difficult for the victim system to differentiate between legitimate traffic and the flood of echo replies generated by the intermediary systems.

How Did Smurf Attacks Originate?

Smurf Attacks have been around for decades and have evolved as technology, and internet connectivity have changed. The origins of Smurf Attacks can be traced back to the late 1990s when the Internet Control Message Protocol (ICMP) was first introduced as part of the TCP/IP protocol suite. ICMP was designed to provide feedback about the status of a network and help troubleshoot network connectivity issues.

Unfortunately, attackers quickly discovered that ICMP could also be used as a weapon. In 1997, a hacker named Jolt2 discovered that by sending a flood of ICMP echo requests to a victim system, he could cause it to become unresponsive. This was the first known instance of what would later be called a Smurf Attack.

In the years that followed, Smurf Attacks became increasingly common, and attackers began to use them to target large networks and internet service providers (ISPs). One of the most notable examples of a Smurf Attack occurred in 2000, when a group of hackers targeted the University of Minnesota with a massive Smurf Attack, causing significant disruption to the university's network.

Despite being a relatively old attack technique, Smurf Attacks are still relevant today. They remain popular for attackers because they are relatively simple and can cause significant damage. Additionally, with the increasing number of internet-connected devices, there are more potential targets for attackers to exploit.

Want Guaranteed Protection Against SIM Swap? Reach Out to Us.

Types of Smurf Attack

Smurf Attacks are a severe threat to network security. Attackers use various techniques to overwhelm victim systems with traffic, making them unresponsive and causing significant disruption. These attacks can range in difficulty and how much harm they can cause their victims. Here are the most common types you should know about:

Basic Smurf Attack 

This type of attack is the most straightforward and easiest to execute. In a Basic Smurf Attack, the attacker sends a flood of ICMP echo requests to a victim system, using the victim's IP address as the source address. The idea is to flood the victim system with so much traffic that it becomes overwhelmed and unresponsive. This is possible because of the way that ICMP works. When a system receives an ICMP echo request, it responds with an ICMP echo reply. The attacker takes advantage of this by sending a flood of requests to the victim system, sending a flood of replies back to the victim, effectively drowning it in traffic.

Distributed Smurf Attack 

This type of attack is similar to the Basic Smurf Attack but is carried out using a botnet, a network of compromised devices that the attacker controls. In a Distributed Smurf Attack, the attacker sends a flood of ICMP echo requests to the victim system from many different sources, making it even more challenging to defend against. Using a botnet, the attacker can increase the traffic sent to the victim system, making the attack more powerful and harder to detect.

Amplified Smurf Attack 

In an Amplified Smurf Attack, the attacker uses intermediary systems configured to amplify the attack traffic. This makes the attack even more powerful and challenging to defend against. The attacker sends the ICMP echo requests to the intermediary systems, amplifying the traffic and sending it to the victim system. This attack is often used in conjunction with a botnet, making it even more challenging to stop. Intermediary systems that can be used for amplification include open DNS resolvers and Network Time Protocol (NTP) servers.

Ping of Death Smurf Attack  

This attack takes advantage of a vulnerability in the victim system's network stack. The attacker sends oversized ICMP packets to the victim system, causing it to crash or become unresponsive. The vulnerability is caused by a flaw in how some systems handle oversized packets. When a system receives a large packet, it tries to allocate memory to hold the packet. The system may crash or become unresponsive if the packet is too big. This type of attack is less common than it once was, but it is still a threat to older systems that must be adequately updated or patched.

Fraggle Attack 

A Fraggle Attack is similar to a Smurf Attack, but instead of using ICMP traffic, the attacker uses User Datagram Protocol (UDP) traffic. The attacker sends a flood of UDP packets to the victim system, using the victim's IP address as the source. Like a Smurf Attack, a Fraggle Attack can quickly overwhelm the victim's system and cause it to become unresponsive. Fraggle Attacks are not as common as Smurf Attacks, but they still threaten organizations and individuals.

Consequences of Smurf Attacks

Smurf Attacks can have severe consequences for both individuals and organizations. The consequences of a Smurf Attack can be severe, including data loss, service disruption, and financial losses. In some cases, the attack can even permanently damage the targeted system or network. Here are some of the most significant impacts of these attacks:

Network Disruption 

Smurf Attacks can cause significant network disruption, making it difficult or impossible for users to access essential resources or services. The attack floods the victim system with a high traffic volume, overwhelming its resources and making it unresponsive or crashing together. This can result in lost productivity and revenue and damage the organization's reputation if customers or clients need access to their services.

Financial Losses 

Financial losses are another significant consequence of Smurf Attacks. For businesses that rely on their websites or networks to conduct their operations, a Smurf Attack can prevent them from processing orders or sales. The financial impact can be severe if this occurs during a peak sales period, such as a holiday season or a product launch. Smurf Attacks can also result in increased expenses, such as those incurred from repairing and replacing damaged systems or implementing additional security measures.

Data Loss 

Smurf Attacks can also result in data loss or corruption. If a system crashes due to the attack, data stored on that system may become inaccessible or even permanently lost. This can be particularly damaging if the data is critical to the organization's operations or contains sensitive information such as customer data, financial records, or intellectual property.

Reputation Damage 

When a company's systems are down, or its services are inaccessible due to a Smurf Attack, it can damage its reputation with customers and partners. The organization may appear unprofessional, unreliable, or insecure, negatively impacting customer trust and loyalty. This can damage the organization's reputation long-term and even result in losing customers or clients.

Legal Consequences 

In addition to the financial and reputational damage, Smurf Attacks can also have legal consequences. Depending on the nature of the attack and the laws in the affected jurisdiction, victims may be able to pursue legal action against the attackers to recover damages. Organizations that experience a Smurf Attack may also face penalties for violating regulations or contractual obligations if they cannot fulfill their duties due to the attack.

Smurf Attack Prevention Tactics

Like most other cyber security threats, you can also prevent Smurf attacks. Understanding the prevention tactics is essential to ensure your business is secure. Here are some things you can do to prevent a Smurf Attack on your business:

Implement Access Controls

Access controls are security measures to restrict unauthorized access to a system or network. In the case of Smurf Attacks, access controls can limit who can send ICMP packets to your network. By configuring firewalls only to allow ICMP traffic from trusted sources, such as your network or specific IP addresses, you can prevent attackers from exploiting your network using this method.

Network Segmentation 

Network segmentation is dividing a network into smaller, more manageable segments. This approach can help limit the potential damage of a Smurf Attack by isolating the affected systems and containing the attack's impact. By segmenting your network, you can also make identifying and isolating the affected systems easier.

Regular Security Audits 

Regular security audits can help organizations identify vulnerabilities in their systems and networks before attackers exploit them. This can include vulnerability assessments, penetration testing, and other security testing techniques. By regularly reviewing and updating your security controls, policies, and procedures, you can ensure you are up-to-date with the latest security threats and vulnerabilities.

Implement Traffic Filtering 

Traffic filtering inspects network traffic and blocks or allows traffic based on predefined rules. Intrusion prevention systems (IPS) and intrusion detection systems (IDS) are examples of traffic filtering tools that can help prevent Smurf Attacks. These tools can identify and filter out malicious traffic before it reaches your network, reducing the risk of a successful Smurf Attack.

Stay Up-to-Date with Security Best Practices 

Keeping up-to-date with security best practices is essential for preventing Smurf Attacks. This includes staying informed about the latest security threats and vulnerabilities, regularly reviewing and updating your security policies and procedures, and ensuring all employees know their roles and responsibilities in maintaining a secure network.

Use Anti-Malware and Anti-Virus Software 

Anti-malware and anti-virus software can help detect and remove malware or viruses that may be used to launch a Smurf Attack. These tools can also help prevent attackers from gaining access to your network and systems in the first place by identifying and blocking known threats.

How to Deal With a Smurf Attack in Progress?

Firstly, it's essential to identify that a Smurf Attack is occurring. This can be done by monitoring network traffic for abnormally high levels of ICMP traffic or by using intrusion detection systems to detect and alert the attack.

Once you've identified the attack, the next step is to isolate the infected systems. This involves disconnecting affected systems from the network to prevent the attack from spreading and causing further damage. It's also essential to identify the source of the attack and block it from sending any additional ICMP traffic to your network.

After isolating the infected systems and blocking the attack source, the next step is to assess the extent of the damage caused by the attack. This may involve checking for any data loss or corruption or identifying other security vulnerabilities the attacker may have exploited.

Finally, it's essential to implement measures to prevent future attacks. This may include implementing access controls, network segmentation, regular security audits, traffic filtering, staying up-to-date with security best practices, and using anti-malware and anti-virus software. It's also essential to educate employees on the risks of cyber attacks and the importance of adhering to security policies and procedures.

To Sum it Up

Smurf Attacks are a severe threat to businesses and organizations of all sizes. Hackers can use various types of Smurf Attacks to target their victims, causing severe damage to computer networks and systems. Fortunately, there are many steps you can take to prevent a Smurf Attack from happening in the first place, such as implementing proper network security measures, staying up-to-date on the latest security patches, and educating your employees on safe browsing habits. In a Smurf Attack, quick and decisive action can make all the difference in minimizing the damage done. By understanding the basics of Smurf Attacks and taking the necessary steps to prevent and respond to them, you can better protect your network and keep your sensitive data safe. Remember, being proactive in your approach to cybersecurity is vital to staying one step ahead of attackers and keeping your business safe from harm.

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Haseeb Awan
CEO, Efani Secure Mobile

I founded Efani after being Sim Swapped 4 times. I am an experienced CEO with a demonstrated history of working in the crypto and cybersecurity industry. I provide Secure Mobile Service for influential people to protect them against SIM Swaps, eavesdropping, location tracking, and other mobile security threats. I've been covered in New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, Mashable, Hulu, Nasdaq, Netflix, Techcrunch, Coindesk, etc. Contact me at 855-55-EFANI or haseebawan@efani.com for a confidential assessment to see if we're the right fit!

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